Quantcast IMOW - Hope for Grace Kodindo
Stories
Themes
Love
Relationships in changing times. See the Stories>>

Money
Working women talk finances. See the Stories>>

Culture and Conflict
Are we destined to disagree? See the Stories>>

The Future
Envisioning the next 30 years. See the Stories>>

Highlights
Highlighted stories in film, art, music and more. See the Stories>>

War & Dialogue
Speaking from war. Advocating peace. See the Stories>>

Young Men
Our generation: young men speak out. See the Stories>>

Motherhood
Women get candid about pregnancy, parenting and choice. See the Stories>>

Image and Identity
Appearances aren't everything, or are they? See the Stories>>

Online Film Festival
31 films from women directors around the world. See the Stories>>

A Generation Defined
Who are young women today? See the Stories>>

Best of Contest
You came, you saw, you voted. Here are the winners. See the Stories>>
Conversations
What Defines Your Generation of Women?
selected theme



HOME  |   EXPLORE OTHER THEMES     |   STORIES     |  CONVERSATION    |  EVENTS  |  TAKE ACTION  |  ABOUT
Search:  
  GO  
REGISTER  |  LOGIN Change Language»    Invite a friend »
STORY OPTIONS
READ STORY IN
PRINT
SAVE TO YOUR SAVED STORIES
SEND THIS STORY TO A FRIEND
ADD YOUR STORY
TAKE ACTION
Educate yourself!
Want to help in the fight against maternal and infant mortality? Arm yourself with the facts! Visit for research updates, books and news articles. The better informed you are, the better you can teach others.
Improve Access to Maternal Healthcare
Help Family Care International ensure that mothers everywhere have safe births though improved access to maternal healthcare services.
STATISTICS:
Worldwide an estimated 529,000 women die from complications of pregnancy and childbirth each year. That translates into one a minute, 60 an hour, or some 1,450 women a day.
An estimated 20 million women a year suffer pregnancy-related illness after birth. At least 40 percent of women in developing countries experience complications, illnesses or permanent disability during pregnancy, childbirth, or the six weeks after delivery, and 15 percent of women develop potentially life-threatening problems.
Hope for Grace KodindoGALLERYCONVERSATION
 
Khadidja Hissein
Chad
Taprom Cecile
Chad
 Media Center
EDITOR'S NOTE
This film can be purchased from Bullfrog films at:
http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/dmdc.html
Hope for Grace Kodindo’s aim is to give support to the hardworking and dedicated obstetric team at, the Hôpital Général de Référence, the main hospital in N’Djamena, Chad’s capital, and make birth as safe as possible for the 11,000 women a year who deliver their babies there.

The maternity unit has provided us with a wishlist of drugs and equipment including basics such as sutures and paracetamol, as well as surgical instruments, such as caesarian kits, and vital drugs, such as oxytocin. We source vital drugs and equipment at the lowest cost – donated if possible – and deliver them to the hospital, where they are provided free of charge to the women who cannot afford to pay for them. Every penny we receive is spent on sourcing and shipping these goods.

Hope for Grace Kodindo was initially inspired by Dr. Grace, as she is known. Trained as an obstetrician in Canada and Sudan, she could be working on a high salary in the comfortable West. Instead, she went back to Chad, to where she felt her countrywomen needed her more. She has worked at the Hôpital Général de Référence in N’Djamena since 1977 as a team of dedicated staff led by Dr Felicité Belingar.

In June 2005 she was the subject of a BBC Panorama documentary called "Dead Mums Don’t Cry". In the UK, millions of viewers saw how, in the face of acute shortages and government indifference, the hospital staff struggled to provide care for the women and babies in their care. The documentary has been shown around the world, even to the United Nations. The message is clear – why should women in Africa die while their counterparts in the West live?

Hope for Grace Kodindo is not about one doctor. It’s about hope for all women in Chad, and indeed in Africa as a whole. A hope that one day soon the world will regard them as equals with their counterparts in the rich West.

“I cannot explain how I became sick. A month ago, I was told not to eat foods with salt because I have started to have edema. Suddenly, this morning, I had headache and then I lost consciousness and I was taken to hospital. I have never heard about [magnesium sulphate], in my life. But my relatives told me that it was with this drug that you saved me and my baby’s life and for free, without paying any money for it. Thank you for saving me.” Testimony by Khadidja Hissein, a patient from Diguel-Nord, N’Djamena, who survived eclampsia after being treated by Magnesium sulfate donated by HFGK.*

“In our culture, eclampsia is considered a like a disease produced by witches. Even in 2004, one of my cousin died from this disease after spending two days in a house of a traditional healer in near by bush. I did not believe that my sister was going to survive [eclampsia] and above all without paying for the drug. I do not know how to thank you. I ask God to reimburse you for that. I ask all women with convulsions during pregnancy to go to hospital instead of wasting their money unnecessarily on traditional healers and other Marabous.” Testimony by Taprom Cecile from Wallia Barriere / N’Djamena a relative of a patient who survive eclampsia after treatment by Magnesium sulphate donated by HFGK.*

* Eclampsia is a serious complication of pregnancy and is characterized by hypertension and in its later stages convulsions and/or loss of consciousness and heart failure. Eclampsia can be fatal to both the mother and the unborn child.
FLAG THIS STORY FOR REVIEW
Maternal Health
Conversations
(67 comments)
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
nicolas nicolas
Belgium
Latest Comment
Bonjour je m'appel Nicolas Jacob je suis d'origine éthiopie de nationalité Belge je suis adopté et mon surnom est le meme que vous SHASHU j'avais beaucoup de question a vous poser sur l'éthiopie sur vos origine est ce que ce prénom est...
ADDED STORIES (4)
Add
 
Angela Gorman
United Kingdom

Angela Gorman
United Kingdom

Angela Gorman
United Kingdom
RELATED ITEMS (16)

 
Nina Paley
United States

GO TO STORY »
Agnès Dherbeys - EVE photographer
France
After four centuries spent under Portuguese administration...
GO TO STORY »
Cara Biasucci
United States
In private hospitals in Brazil the cesarean rate averages...
GO TO STORY »
Meselech Mina
Ethiopia
My name is Meselech Mina; I am from Basketo, Gamogofa,...
GO TO STORY »

©2008 International Museum of Women / Privacy Policy and Disclaimer / Translated by 101translations / Change Language
The content in this exhibit does not necessarily represent the opinions of the International Museum of Women, or its partners or sponsors.